Showing posts tagged ancient peoples
Golden cutout disk 
The middle is decorated with a crab. 18.7cm in diameter (7 3/8 inch.) 
Peru, 2nd - 3rd century AD. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

Golden cutout disk 

The middle is decorated with a crab. 18.7cm in diameter (7 3/8 inch.) 

Peru, 2nd - 3rd century AD. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all our followers!

It’s that time of year again! 

We’d like to thank all of you for following the blog, and wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

Just like last year, the admin of the blog will be taking a hiatus from now until the New Year, so we will be unable to answer any asks that come in between now and then (of course they will be answered in the New Year!), but we do have a large queue of objects for this hiatus, so the blog will still be “active” for you guys to enjoy. 

With this last bit of admin done, all that remains is for us to give you best wishes for the festive period and we’ll see you in 2014!

The Ancient Peoples Admin Team

christmas (1632) Animated Gif on Giphy

Admin News: We’re Opening Submissions for a trial period!

ancientpeoples:

Hey guys!

Since we’ve been really busy of late with our own work, it’s made interacting with you guys a bit difficult and we regret that Suggestion Sunday/Solve it Sunday haven’t run in months. We’re just run off our feet! 

To remedy this, we have decided to do a trial of opening submissions, for one month, so that you guys can submit objects that you have seen that you think are awesome, write ups of galleries containing ancient objects you’ve seen on museum visits, or write ups of specific cultures that you think would be interesting for your fellow followers. 

We’re doing this as we recognise that our followers have a wide knowledge base that exceeds ours in some areas, and they may be able to tell you guys about things we could never dream of. We think this would be beneficial to us all in the long run and more fun for you, our followers. 

So, these are our submission guidelines (which can also be found on the submission page):

1) Any post made must be on a subject within our given time frame - 7000 BC - 600 AD (or on Pre History). If you’re posting about a trip to a museum, please make sure that you only cover the “Ancient” part of the trip :)

2) Object posts must follow the same framework as our own object posts, along with the object being correctly sourced to where the object came from (i.e. British Museum web page or Flicker page etc). We will add submission credit to your post. If the photo is your own photo, please let us know and we will give you photo credit. 

3) Information posts must follow our format, but of course you can add sources if you wish. These will also have submission credit given to you.

4) All posts will be vetted before being added to the queue. This is just to catch any spelling mistakes, or historical errors before your post is put out. 

5) We observe the right to delete any abusive material or posts we feel aren’t appropriate to be put out. 

6) We have a very long queue and, depending on what type of post you have submitted (object or information), it may take a while to turn up on the blog. It has reached us and we ask you to be patient. 

That’s all the guidelines for now. If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask us :)

So that’s it guys! We hope that this will be successful so that we can keep doing this in the future. 

The Ancient Peoples Admin Team

Edit: It would be useful if admin remembered to add a link to the submit page. (She’s been researching all day) You can find it here.

Reblogging today for those awesome people in a different timezone!

(Reblogged from ancientpeoples)

Admin News: We’re Opening Submissions for a trial period!

Hey guys!

Since we’ve been really busy of late with our own work, it’s made interacting with you guys a bit difficult and we regret that Suggestion Sunday/Solve it Sunday haven’t run in months. We’re just run off our feet! 

To remedy this, we have decided to do a trial of opening submissions, for one month, so that you guys can submit objects that you have seen that you think are awesome, write ups of galleries containing ancient objects you’ve seen on museum visits, or write ups of specific cultures that you think would be interesting for your fellow followers. 

We’re doing this as we recognise that our followers have a wide knowledge base that exceeds ours in some areas, and they may be able to tell you guys about things we could never dream of. We think this would be beneficial to us all in the long run and more fun for you, our followers. 

So, these are our submission guidelines (which can also be found on the submission page):

1) Any post made must be on a subject within our given time frame - 7000 BC - 600 AD (or on Pre History). If you’re posting about a trip to a museum, please make sure that you only cover the “Ancient” part of the trip :)

2) Object posts must follow the same framework as our own object posts, along with the object being correctly sourced to where the object came from (i.e. British Museum web page or Flicker page etc). We will add submission credit to your post. If the photo is your own photo, please let us know and we will give you photo credit. 

3) Information posts must follow our format, but of course you can add sources if you wish. These will also have submission credit given to you.

4) All posts will be vetted before being added to the queue. This is just to catch any spelling mistakes, or historical errors before your post is put out. 

5) We observe the right to delete any abusive material or posts we feel aren’t appropriate to be put out. 

6) We have a very long queue and, depending on what type of post you have submitted (object or information), it may take a while to turn up on the blog. It has reached us and we ask you to be patient. 

That’s all the guidelines for now. If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask us :)

So that’s it guys! We hope that this will be successful so that we can keep doing this in the future. 

The Ancient Peoples Admin Team

Edit: It would be useful if admin remembered to add a link to the submit page. (She’s been researching all day) You can find it here.

It’s Ancient Peoples 1st Birthday!

That’s right! Ancient Peoples has been running an entire year; bringing you objects and information, for you enjoyment, daily!

We thought long and hard about what to do for you guys to show our appreciation for your continued support and we came up with this: Ancient Cats

Because what do our followers and the internet love just as much as Ancient History? Cats! Drawn by one of our lovely admin!

So, thank you to you all for being with us for a whole year, and we hope we’ll still be here for a good while yet!

It was requested by several people to be made reblogable and we have made it so.

Admin Update: New FAQ Page

Hey guys! 

We’ve made a little addition to our blog in the form of an FAQ page which you can find here (x) Since we’ve been getting a lot of questions that are a repeat of others we’ve been asked before, we thought we’d create a handy place we can direct people to. 

We hope this clears some things up for everyone :)

The Ancient Peoples Admin Team

Suggestion Sunday

The ask box is open for Suggestion Sunday as per usual and we remind you to, please, check all our tags and previous asks before submitting and also to make sure that the culture is not after 500 AD as that is our cut off point.

The ask box is here and anon is on if you wish to use it.

Happy Inboxing!

The Ancient Peoples Team 

Antikythera Mechanism

ancientpeoples:

image

Found in a shipwreck in 1901, the Antikythera Mechanism has been studied for over a century but it is only recently that we have began to understand it.

The construction of the mechanism has been dated to the 1st century BC. It appears to be one of a kind; and technologically complex items, like this, are not seen again until the 14th century AD. Though it is possible it had some predecessors in the Hellenistic period that led to this design, none have been found.

It has been identified as a device which calculated astronomical positions, it is sometimes referred to as the first analog computer. It contains gears and appears to be made of a bronze alloy. However, corrosion has made an accurate analysis impossible.  

image

It has more than 30 gears, and some have estimated it had up to 72 gears when complete. The date would have been entered via a crank (now lost), and the mechanism would have calculated the position of the sun, moon and other astronomical objects. It is based on a geacentric model. It has one main dial on the front and two on the back. The front dial is marked off with 365 days (based on the Egyptian calendar). A second dial is marked off with the Greek signs of the Zodiac divided into degrees. There were probably at least three hands to show the date and the position of the sun and moon. There was yet another mechanism which displayed the phase of the moon. The inscriptions on the device also refer to Venus and Mars, whose position may have also been calculated with the device. There is a parapegma on the front dial which marked the rising and setting of certain stars.

Amazingly it also had a dial on the back which displayed the 4 year Olympiad cycle. It is divided into 4 sections, each inscribed with a year number and the names of two Panhellenic Games: those of Isthmia, Olympia, Nemea and Pythia; and two lesser games, those of Naa (held at Dodona) and a games yet to be deciphered.

It may have also had the ability to estimate solar eclipses.

Several reconstructions of the device exist. Below is one example from a BBC 4 documentary. 

image

Where did it come from? Some have suggested the island of Rhodes, where the Academy of Posidonius was a centre of astronomical and engineering. Others have suggested Corinth with a possible link to Archimedes. It is possible that is was being transported to Rome, along with other treasures from the area, to be in a triumphal parade staged by Julius Caesar. 

In literature, Cicero refers to a device similar to this built by Archimedes and brought to Rome by Marcellus in 212 BC which was kept as a family heirloom. Archimedes was said to have written a work on the creation of these sort of devices calledOn Sphere Making It is seen as too sophisticated to be a one off, instead was the result of a developed technology. 

One display at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens.

(Reblogged from ancientpeoples)
ancientpeoples:


Herodotus
Herodotus is often referred to as the “father of History” in so far as he seems to be one of the first “historic” writers. However I would be inclined to called him the “grandfather of History”…or maybe the “slighty mad uncle in the corner at parties of History”. Some of the accounts, or stories, in his “Histories” are particularly fanciful. This has led to his other nickname “The father of Lies”. This is unfair. Herodotus’ work literally means “Inquires”, they are him exploring the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars (along the way covering other subjects like geography, anthropology, ethnology, zoology, fables and folklore) where he inquires and reports back all he has heard. Things are worth reporting primarily if they are interesting, not just if they are true or not.
His focus is on the achievements of mankind, not of the gods and heroes like epic poetry, and of great and marvellous deeds (by all peoples and even in nature like the Nile inundation.) He attempts to build a full a picture as possible, using these of the build up to the War and then the War itself.
I want to share some of the brilliant and strange stories which turn up in Herodotus’ work. They are testament to the fantastic imagination of mankind.
All these examples come from Book II (the Egyptian logoi). I’ll probably do some more examples another time.
On the Nile (2.19-27)
He gives to following reasons for the Nile flood:
1. Winds- North winds blow, preventing adequate flow to the sea. (Herodotus argues that this incorrect because it floods even if the winds fail and the winds have no effect on other rivers)
2. It flows from the great Ocean that encircles the world (a more legendary explanation apparently)
3. It’s caused by melting snow (this is apparently just as worthless a theory as the others because the countries the Nile comes from are hotter than Egypt)
4. Displaced water from other rivers because the sun changes his path in different seasons (H’s own theory, I love ancient Greek logic)
 On the Egyptians being weird (2.35-8)
1. The women go to market and men stay at home and weave. Women even urinated standing up and men sitting down. 
2. They knead bread dough with their feet and clay with their hands and even handle dung (the horror!)
3. They are religious to excess, and make a point of washing cups and clothes (how dare they!), they even circumcise themselves to be clean rather than comely (I love my translation)
On the Hippotamus (2.71)
1. It has 4 legs, cloven hoofs like an ox, a horse’s mane and tail, conspicuous tusks, a voice like a horse’s neigh, and is the size of a very large ox (I am really not sure if he ever saw a hippo from that…)
On the Phoenix (2.73)
1. Visits every 500 years when its parent bird dies. Its gold and red and shaped exactly like an eagle. 
2. One story says it carries a lump of myrrh to make into a kind of egg coffin for its dad and then buries it in the temple of the sun (Herodotus doesn’t find this credible surprisingly)
On flying Snakes (2.75-6)
1. Opposite Buto there are loads of skeletons of flying snakes piled up in a mountain pass. The snakes try to migrate into Egypt from Arabia but the ibis greet them at this pass and kill all of them.
2. They have wings like a bat.

Blind Pheros
1. Pheros was a King of Egypt who went blind. He had got angry at the river for flooding too high and thrown a spear at it. (which of course made him blind…)
2. After 10 years the oracle at Buto said he’d served his punishment and would be cured if he washed his eyes out with the urine of a woman who had never slept with any man except her husband. So he tried his wife’s urine…didn’t work (awkward), then many many many other women…eventually one worked and he could see again (huzah!).
3. All those women whose urine failed were collected together and burned. He then married the lady whose pee worked (I wonder what ever happened to her husband…)

The Clever Thief
1. Once there was a very rich king who put all his silver in an elaborate treasury. The builder eventually died, but on his death bed he told his 2 sons about a secret door. The brothers used it and eventually the king noticed. He hid some traps inside the treasury. Next robbery one brother got caught in the trap. He begged his brother to chop off his head so that the king wouldn’t recognise him and the brother could carry on as normal. So the brother did and the king found a headless corpse in the trap.
2. The king hung the body up and had it guarded trying to spot the thief should he come and mourn. The thief’s mum was angry and wanted the body of her son to bury. She nagged the remaining brother. He got the guards very very drunk and stole the body, he even shaved the right cheek of each of the guards.
3. King was very angry. So he order his daughter to join the local brothel and ask every man who came to her what was the cleverest and wickedest thing they had ever done in the hopes of catching the thief. So eventually the thief arrives. But he has heard about the king’s plan and so cuts off the arm of his corpse and goes to see the princess. 
4. He tells her about cutting off his brother’s head (wickedest thing) and getting the guards drunk (cleverest thing). She quickly grabs him and calls her father, but she grabs the corpses arm and the thief escapes.
5. The king is impressed. He sends out a message that the thief is forgiven as he is clearly the cleverest man ever. Thief appears and marries the prostituted princess. (Yay for happy endings.)
Cheops and his Pyramid
1. He closed all the temples and made all his people slaves. He made them build his pyramid.
2. He ran of money so made his daughter a prostitute. She charged each punter one stone. These were made into the middle pyramid at Giza.
Well there we go for now, I hope you have enjoyed reading a few of these. The ancient writers tell some really amazing stories and hopefully I’ll get round to writing a few more of these. Like the one-eyed men chasing griffins, or the gold digging ants of India, or the queen who went too far and chopped off the breast of all the women in a town and hung them up on the walls as their husbands were slowly impaled beneath them… but its ok the queen ends up being eaten by worms.

ancientpeoples:

Herodotus

Herodotus is often referred to as the “father of History” in so far as he seems to be one of the first “historic” writers. However I would be inclined to called him the “grandfather of History”…or maybe the “slighty mad uncle in the corner at parties of History”. Some of the accounts, or stories, in his “Histories” are particularly fanciful. This has led to his other nickname “The father of Lies”. This is unfair. Herodotus’ work literally means “Inquires”, they are him exploring the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars (along the way covering other subjects like geography, anthropology, ethnology, zoology, fables and folklore) where he inquires and reports back all he has heard. Things are worth reporting primarily if they are interesting, not just if they are true or not.

His focus is on the achievements of mankind, not of the gods and heroes like epic poetry, and of great and marvellous deeds (by all peoples and even in nature like the Nile inundation.) He attempts to build a full a picture as possible, using these of the build up to the War and then the War itself.

I want to share some of the brilliant and strange stories which turn up in Herodotus’ work. They are testament to the fantastic imagination of mankind.

All these examples come from Book II (the Egyptian logoi). I’ll probably do some more examples another time.

On the Nile (2.19-27)

He gives to following reasons for the Nile flood:

1. Winds- North winds blow, preventing adequate flow to the sea. (Herodotus argues that this incorrect because it floods even if the winds fail and the winds have no effect on other rivers)

2. It flows from the great Ocean that encircles the world (a more legendary explanation apparently)

3. It’s caused by melting snow (this is apparently just as worthless a theory as the others because the countries the Nile comes from are hotter than Egypt)

4. Displaced water from other rivers because the sun changes his path in different seasons (H’s own theory, I love ancient Greek logic)

On the Egyptians being weird (2.35-8)

1. The women go to market and men stay at home and weave. Women even urinated standing up and men sitting down.

2. They knead bread dough with their feet and clay with their hands and even handle dung (the horror!)

3. They are religious to excess, and make a point of washing cups and clothes (how dare they!), they even circumcise themselves to be clean rather than comely (I love my translation)

On the Hippotamus (2.71)

1. It has 4 legs, cloven hoofs like an ox, a horse’s mane and tail, conspicuous tusks, a voice like a horse’s neigh, and is the size of a very large ox (I am really not sure if he ever saw a hippo from that…)

On the Phoenix (2.73)

1. Visits every 500 years when its parent bird dies. Its gold and red and shaped exactly like an eagle.

2. One story says it carries a lump of myrrh to make into a kind of egg coffin for its dad and then buries it in the temple of the sun (Herodotus doesn’t find this credible surprisingly)

On flying Snakes (2.75-6)

1. Opposite Buto there are loads of skeletons of flying snakes piled up in a mountain pass. The snakes try to migrate into Egypt from Arabia but the ibis greet them at this pass and kill all of them.

2. They have wings like a bat.


Blind Pheros

1. Pheros was a King of Egypt who went blind. He had got angry at the river for flooding too high and thrown a spear at it. (which of course made him blind…)

2. After 10 years the oracle at Buto said he’d served his punishment and would be cured if he washed his eyes out with the urine of a woman who had never slept with any man except her husband. So he tried his wife’s urine…didn’t work (awkward), then many many many other women…eventually one worked and he could see again (huzah!).

3. All those women whose urine failed were collected together and burned. He then married the lady whose pee worked (I wonder what ever happened to her husband…)


The Clever Thief

1. Once there was a very rich king who put all his silver in an elaborate treasury. The builder eventually died, but on his death bed he told his 2 sons about a secret door. The brothers used it and eventually the king noticed. He hid some traps inside the treasury. Next robbery one brother got caught in the trap. He begged his brother to chop off his head so that the king wouldn’t recognise him and the brother could carry on as normal. So the brother did and the king found a headless corpse in the trap.

2. The king hung the body up and had it guarded trying to spot the thief should he come and mourn. The thief’s mum was angry and wanted the body of her son to bury. She nagged the remaining brother. He got the guards very very drunk and stole the body, he even shaved the right cheek of each of the guards.

3. King was very angry. So he order his daughter to join the local brothel and ask every man who came to her what was the cleverest and wickedest thing they had ever done in the hopes of catching the thief. So eventually the thief arrives. But he has heard about the king’s plan and so cuts off the arm of his corpse and goes to see the princess.

4. He tells her about cutting off his brother’s head (wickedest thing) and getting the guards drunk (cleverest thing). She quickly grabs him and calls her father, but she grabs the corpses arm and the thief escapes.

5. The king is impressed. He sends out a message that the thief is forgiven as he is clearly the cleverest man ever. Thief appears and marries the prostituted princess. (Yay for happy endings.)

Cheops and his Pyramid

1. He closed all the temples and made all his people slaves. He made them build his pyramid.

2. He ran of money so made his daughter a prostitute. She charged each punter one stone. These were made into the middle pyramid at Giza.

Well there we go for now, I hope you have enjoyed reading a few of these. The ancient writers tell some really amazing stories and hopefully I’ll get round to writing a few more of these. Like the one-eyed men chasing griffins, or the gold digging ants of India, or the queen who went too far and chopped off the breast of all the women in a town and hung them up on the walls as their husbands were slowly impaled beneath them… but its ok the queen ends up being eaten by worms.

(Reblogged from ancientpeoples)
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