Showing posts tagged ancient egypt

Alabaster jar representing the god Duamutef 

Duamutef is one of the four sons of Horus who were entrusted with protecting the organs of a mummy. On this jar the paint is still visible and a lively jackal face can be seen. It is 31cm high and 13.5cm in diameter ( 12 3/16 x 5 5/16 inch.) 

Found in Abydos, Upper Egypt. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Faience amulet of goddess Nut 

The goddess is shown sitting on her legs, spreading her wings. She is wearing a crown of horns that enclose the sun. This represents her as the sky goddess. 11.5 x 23.6 in centimeters ( 4 1/2 x  9 5/16 inch.) 

It was found in Abydos, Upper Egypt. 

Egyptian, Third Intermediate Period, 21st - 25th dynasty, 1070 - 664 BC.

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Portrait of an elderly man 

Portrait is made on sycomore wood. Material used is tempera. The man is flanked by Egyptian gods; on the right the god Horus and on the left the goddess Hathor. 38 cm high and 22.4cm wide ( 14 15/16 x 8 13/16 inch.) 

Egyptian, made in the Roman Period, around 250 AD. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Alabaster vases of monkeys holding their young
18.6 cm high and 13.7 cm high. 
Egyptian, Old Kingdom, Dynasty 6, Reign of Pepi I, 2289 - 2255 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

Alabaster vases of monkeys holding their young

18.6 cm high and 13.7 cm high. 

Egyptian, Old Kingdom, Dynasty 6, Reign of Pepi I, 2289 - 2255 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Mummy coffin of Henettawy 

This coffin is from the 3rd intermediate when tombs were no longer safe and coffins became more elaborate. All the scenes that were on the walls of tombs before, are now represented on the coffins. 

Found in Egypt, Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, Tomb of Henettawy (MMA 59) 

Egyptian, 3rd Intermediate Period, 21st dynasty, 1000 - 945 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Terracotta water jar 

This water bottle is from the tomb of Tutanckamun ( KV 54) and was used in his funerary rituals. It is 36.5cm high and 15cm in diameter. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, Reign of Tutankhamun, ca. 1336 - 1327 BC. 

Found in Egypt, Thebes. Valley of the Kings, Tomb 54 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Scarab Inscribed with the Throne Name of Thutmosis III

Early 18th Dynasty, New Kingdom

c.1479-1458 BC

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Limestone ostracon with image of a hippopotamus 

The details in the image are remarkable. It is 10.8cm high and 12cm wide. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, 1479 - 1425 BC. 

Found in Thebes, Upper Egypt, Deir el -Bahri, 

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

Pectoral and Necklace of Sithathoryunet with the Name of Senwosret II

12th Dynasty, Middle Kingdom, Egypt

c.1887-1878 BC

This pectoral is composed around the throne name of King Senwosret II. It was found among the jewellery of Princess Sithathoryunet in a special niche of her underground tomb beside the pyramid of Senwosret II at Lahun. Hieroglyphic signs make up the design, and the whole may be read: “The god of the rising sun grants life and dominion over all that the sun encircles for one million one hundred thousand years [i.e., eternity] to King Khakheperre [Senwosret II].”
This cloisonné pectoral is inlaid with 372 carefully cut pieces of semiprecious stones. The heraldic design is replete with symbolism. Zigzag lines on the base bar represent the primordial waters out of which the primeval hill emerged. Each of the falcons, symbols of the sun god, clasps a circular hieroglyph meaning “encircled,” thus declaring the solar deity’s supreme power over the universe. The same hieroglyph, elongated to form a cartouche, encircles the throne name of Senwosret II, Khakheperre. Flanking the king’s name are two ankh hieroglyphs (meaning “life”) suspended from cobras whose tails are wound around the sun disk on the falcons’ heads. These snakes represent Nekhbet and Udjo, the traditional protector goddesses of the king. Supporting the royal cartouche is the kneeling god Heh clutching two palm ribs symbolizing “millions of years.” Thus the king’s life and existence in time are described as part of a universe created and sustained by the supreme sun god.
Jewellery worn by royal women during the Middle Kingdom was not simply for adornment or an indication of status but was also symbolic of concepts and myths surrounding Egyptian royalty. Jewellery imbued a royal woman with superhuman powers and thus enabled her to support the king in his role as guarantor of divine order on earth. It was essentially the king who benefited from the magical powers inherent in the jewellery worn by the female members of his family, which explains why his name, rather than that of the princess, appears in the designs.
Since the tomb of the princess was beside the pyramid of Senwosret, scholars speculate that she was his daughter. Other items in the tomb bear the name of Amenemhat III, suggesting that the princess lived during the reigns of three of the most powerful rulers of Dynasty 12: Senwosret II, Senwosret III, and Amenemhat III.

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Cosmetic box from the tomb of Sennedjem 

19th Dynasty, New Kingdom, Egypt

The lid of this box, which is attached at the back with horizontal pivots, opens to reveal four compartments for cosmetics. The box could be secured by winding a piece of twine around the two knobs at the front. Its elaborate decoration was intended to imitate more expensive boxes inlaid with ebony, ivory, and perhaps cedar or mahogany. 
The box is from the tomb of Sennedjem, who was an artist living in the time of Ramesses II. 

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

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