Limestone double statue of Mahu 

This pair is made for the burial chamber and is meant as a house in which the deceased’s soul could inhabit if it wanted. The owners are shown in their best outfit and wigs. This style is typical of the 18th dynasty; the young faces, the dubble wigs and the style of the dresses. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, after 1450 BC. 

Source: British Museum

Marble head of Sokrates 
32.3cm high
Roman copy of Greek original from 380 -360 BC. 
Source: British Museum

Marble head of Sokrates 

32.3cm high

Roman copy of Greek original from 380 -360 BC. 

Source: British Museum

Relief of Antelopes

Egyptian

ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E.

The scene to which this block once belonged probably showed a desert hunting party. The hunters, Akhenaten and his entourage, would have appeared in chariots bearing down on their helpless prey. Their approach has not gone unnoticed: the ears of the two bubalis antelopes perk up at the sound of danger. The back of a third antelope may be seen in the lower right corner. Such isolated blocks provide a hint of the complex decorative schemes that once existed in the palace at el Amarna.

Source: Brooklyn Museum

Cat with Kittens

Egyptian

ca. 644-30 B.C.

The Egyptians associated the female cat’s fertility and motherly care with several divinities. The base of the statuette of Cat with Kittens is inscribed with a request that Bastet grant life, directly linking the cat pictured here with the goddess Bastet. The kittens here point to the benevolent aspect of this feline divinity, while her pointed ears emphasize the feline’s attentive vigilance and ability to protect its young.

Source: Brooklyn Museum

Block Statue of Padimahes

Egyptian

ca. 680-650 B.C.E.

The upraised face in this statue depicts Padimahes observing a temple procession and reveals that the statue was meant to represent him in a temple after his death. His ba-soul could travel from the tomb and inhabit the statue, allowing him to share in the offerings made to the god in the temple. His ba would then return to the tomb.

Source: Brooklyn Museum

Gold heandband with gazelles and a stag 

The Second Intermediate period is a period when the Egyptian throne is ruled by foreigners. This piece is clearly not Egyptian in style and yet it was made in Egypt. 

Egyptian, Second Intermediate Period, dynasty 15, 1648 - 1550 BC. 

Probably from the Eastern Delta region. 

Source: metropolitan Museum

Faience hippopotamus 

Hippopotami were feared by the Egyptians because these animals are very destructive and dangerous. By making these statues the Egyptian hoped to controle those dangers and keep them at bay. The lotusflowers painted on the animals are symbols of fertility and the marshes where hippo’s mostly stayed. The goddess Taweret is a pregnant hippo and was worshipped by pregnant women to protect their unborn child. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1960 - 1878 BC. 

Found in middle Egypt, Meir, Tomb of Senbi II

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Red quartzite face of Senwosret III

Senwosret III is known for his very individual portraits of an elderly man. He has heavy eyelids, deep lines in his face and his eyebrows are knit together. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, reign of Senwosret III, 1878 - 1840 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Box coffin 

Egyptian, Old Kingdom, 3rd of 4th dynasty, 2649 - 2465 BC. 

Found in Egypt, the Fayum region, Kafr Tarkhan by Petrie excavations. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Sandstone statue of king Montuhotep II 
Statue of the king shows him in his Heb-sed (jubilee) costume. This feast was meant to renew the king’s youth and demonstrate his strength as king, so as to be show to be fit to rule Egypt. 
Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 11th dynasty, 2051 - 2000 BC. 
Found in Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, temple of Montuhotep II 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

Sandstone statue of king Montuhotep II 

Statue of the king shows him in his Heb-sed (jubilee) costume. This feast was meant to renew the king’s youth and demonstrate his strength as king, so as to be show to be fit to rule Egypt. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 11th dynasty, 2051 - 2000 BC. 

Found in Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, temple of Montuhotep II 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

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